Wednesday, 4 November 2015

Recipe: How To Make Raspberry Gin

As regular readers will know, I'm a massive fan of infusing my own gin at home. I'm working on perfecting a damson gin recipe, and one of the most important tasks of my year is making batches of sloe gin from the berries that live here on the farm. However, I'm aware that for those of you who don't live in the countryside like me have difficulties getting hold of ingredients such as sloes and damsons for your gin making. So, I want to introduce you to a recipe I came across a few months ago for how to make your own raspberry gin.
How To Make Raspberry Gin | www.rachelphipps.com @rachelphipps
Homemade Raspberry Gin | www.rachelphipps.com @rachelphipps
So, there is one major difference between making raspberry and sloe gin: the gin you use matters. I buy painfully cheap bottles to make gin with usually, so it came to a great surprise to me infusing this gin (okay, I used home grown raspberries, but just grab them from the supermarket!) that you could still taste the paint stripper-like cheap booze. A do-over was required, using the light but still slightly botanical Rock and Rose Gin. Use your favourite, and enjoy the added fruitiness the raspberries add to the drink. 

I found the measurements for this gin from a copy of Susy Atkins' How To Make Your Own Drinks I nicked off of my Dad, and halved the batch to make this bottle. A bit of a geeky buy, but if you're into making your own drinks, I'd really recommend it. Really though, once you've made it once, play amount with the amounts of sugar and raspberries you use, and which gin you select to suit your own tastes.


  • 100g (3.5 oz) Fresh Raspberries
  • 85g (3 oz) Granulated Sugar
  • 500ml (2 cups) Good Quality Gin


Combine the raspberries (if you're using home grown make sure all leaves and bugs are removed), sugar and gin in a airtight jar (I use the Le Parfait ones, but whatever you have or can find cheaply). Keep the jar in a cool, dark place (apparently sunlight will affect the gin not coming out a pretty, jewel pink) and shake up every few days or so until the sugar is all dissolved, then once a week. Enjoy 10 weeks later, the raspberries strained out and served as a fruity gin and tonic, or in a cocktail. It will be the perfect antidote to the January blues!


Are there any more infused gins that you've made before that you'd recommend? Once it gets to Summer the book as a recipe for cucumber gin that only takes a week to make I'd rather like to try, and for now I think it is about time I try and make my own Limoncello - I get through enough of it!

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